Drug use and involvement in risky driving styles in a sample of university students. The uniHcos project

3Citations
Citations of this article
13Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

Objetivo: Métodos: Resultados: Conclusiones: Objective: Drug and alcohol use are known to increase the risk of traffic accidents, especially among youth. However, the association between habitual drug use and the adoption of risky driving behavior is not well known. The aim of this study was to identify and quantify the association between habitual drug use and involvement in risky driving practices overall and by gender among university students. Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted. The study population was composed of 559 car drivers younger than 31 years who completed an online questionnaire during the 2011-2012 academic year. Among other factors, the questionnaire assessed the following items: habitual drug consumption (20 or more days) during the last year and involvement in other risky driving practices during the last month. Results: A total of 27.7% of students reported they had used drugs regularly during the last year. Drug use was associated with a higher frequency of involvement in risky driving practices. In men, the factors most strongly associated with drug consumption were speeding, driving under influence of alcohol, and feeling drowsy while driving. In women, drug consumption was mainly associated with smoking while driving, drunk driving, and driving without rest. Conclusion: The results of our study support the hypothesis that habitual drug use is associated with an increased frequency of risky driving behavior.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Jiménez-Mejías, E., Medina-García, M. Á., Martínez-Ruiz, V., Pulido-Manzanero, J., & Fernández-Villa, T. (2015). Drug use and involvement in risky driving styles in a sample of university students. The uniHcos project. Gaceta Sanitaria, 29, 4–9. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gaceta.2015.04.008

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free