Ethnoveterinary treatments by dromedary camel herders in the Suleiman Mountainous Region in Pakistan: An observation and questionnaire study

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Abstract

Background: The Suleiman mountainous region is an important cradle of animal domestication and the habitat of many indigenous livestock breeds. The dromedary camel is a highly appreciated and valued animal and represents an important genetic resource. Camel herders, living in remote areas, have developed their own ways to treat diseases in camels, based on a long time of experience.Methods: Information about the diseases and the ethnoveterinary practices performed was collected from a total of 90 herders and healers by interviews and participant observations.Results: The respondents classified the diseased in major and minor fractions. Clinical signs were given in detail. Mange followed by trypanosomosis and orf were considered the most prevalent diseases, and also caused the greatest economic losses. Orf was regarded the most complex disease. The season was considered to have great influence on the occurrence of the diseases. A variety of different treatments were described, such as medicinal plants, cauterization, odorant/fly repellents, pesticides, larvicides, cold drink, yogurt and supportive therapy (hot food, hot drink).Conclusions: There is paramount need to document and validate the indigenous knowledge about animal agriculture in general and ethnoveterinary practices in particular. This knowledge is rapidly disappearing and represents a cultural heritage as well as a valuable resource for attaining food security and sovereignty. © 2010 Raziq et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

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Raziq, A., de Verdier, K., & Younas, M. (2010). Ethnoveterinary treatments by dromedary camel herders in the Suleiman Mountainous Region in Pakistan: An observation and questionnaire study. Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, 6. https://doi.org/10.1186/1746-4269-6-16

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