Longitudinal change in hippocampal and dorsal anterior insulae functional connectivity in subjective cognitive decline

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Abstract

Background: Subjective cognitive decline, perceived worsening of cognitive ability without apparent performance issues on clinical assessment, may be an important precursor to dementia. While previous cross-sectional research has demonstrated aberrant brain functional connectivity in subjective cognitive decline, longitudinal evaluation remains limited. Methods: Here, we examined trajectories of functional connectivity over three measurement occasions ~18 months apart, using voxelwise latent growth models in cognitively unimpaired older adults with varying self-report of subjective cognitive decline (N = 69). Results: We found that individuals who reported a greater degree of subjective cognitive decline showed a larger subsequent decrease in connectivity between components of the default mode network and increase in connectivity between salience and default mode network components. The change in functional connectivity was observed in the absence of change in cognitive performance. Conclusion: The results indicate that functional brain changes may underly the experience of cognitive decline before deterioration reaches a level detected by formal cognitive assessment.

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Viviano, R. P., & Damoiseaux, J. S. (2021). Longitudinal change in hippocampal and dorsal anterior insulae functional connectivity in subjective cognitive decline. Alzheimer’s Research and Therapy, 13(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s13195-021-00847-y

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