Octreotide long-acting repeatable in the treatment of neuroendocrine tumors: Patient selection and perspectives

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Abstract

Over the past three decades, the incidence and prevalence of neuroendocrine tumors have gradually increased. Due to the slow-growing nature of these tumors, most cases are diagnosed at advanced stages. Prognosis and survival are associated with location of primary lesion, biochemical functional status, differentiation, initial staging, and response to therapy. Octreotide, the first synthetic somatostatin analog, was initially used for the management of gastrointestinal symptoms associated with functional carcinoid tumors. Its commercial development over time led to long-acting repeatable octreotide acetate, a long-acting version that provided greater administration convenience. Recent research demonstrates that octreotide’s efficacy has evolved beyond symptomatic management to targeted therapy with antitumoral effects. This review examines the history and development of octreotide, provides a synopsis on the classification, grading, and staging of neuroendocrine tumors, and reviews the evidence of long-acting repeatable octreotide acetate as monotherapy and in combination with other treatment modalities in the management of non-pituitary neuroendocrine tumors with special attention to recent high-quality Phase III trials.

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Yau, H., Kinaan, M., Quinn, S. L., & Moraitis, A. G. (2017, December 6). Octreotide long-acting repeatable in the treatment of neuroendocrine tumors: Patient selection and perspectives. Biologics: Targets and Therapy. Dove Medical Press Ltd. https://doi.org/10.2147/BTT.S108818

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