States’ Abortion Laws Associated With Intimate Partner Violence– Related Homicide Of Women And Girls In The US, 2014–20

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Abstract

Women who are pregnant or recently gave birth are significantly more likely to be killed by an intimate partner than nonpregnant, nonpostpartum women of reproductive age, implicating the risk of fatal violence conferred by pregnancy itself. The rapidly increasing passage of state legislation has restricted or banned access to abortion care across the US. We used the most recent and only source of population-based data to examine the association between state laws that restrict access to abortion and trends in intimate partner violence–related homicide among women and girls ages 10–44 during the period 2014–20. Using robust difference-in-differences ecologic modeling, we found that enforcement of each additional Targeted Regulation of Abortion Providers (TRAP) law was associated with a 3.4 percent increase in the rate of intimate partner violence–related homicide in this population. We estimated that 24.3 intimate partner violence–related homicides of women and girls ages 10–44 were associated with TRAP laws implemented in the states and years included in this analysis. Assessment of policies that restrict access to abortion should consider their potential harm to reproductive-age women through the risk for violent death.

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APA

Wallace, M. E., Stoecker, C., Sauter, S., & Vilda, D. (2024). States’ Abortion Laws Associated With Intimate Partner Violence– Related Homicide Of Women And Girls In The US, 2014–20. Health Affairs, 43(5), 682–690. https://doi.org/10.1377/hlthaff.2023.01098

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