Effects of cocaine on dopamine receptor gene expression: A study in the postmortem human brain

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Abstract

The effects of chronic cocaine exposure on dopamine D1 and D2 receptor gene expression in the human brain were studied in postmortem samples from chronic cocaine abusing and matched control subjects. Using in situ hybridization and receptor autoradiography to examine messenger ribonucleic acid (RNA) and binding sites, respectively, neither D1 nor D2 receptor expression was found to be changed in the nucleus accumbens, caudate, putamen, or substantia nigra of the cocaine-exposed subjects. Although chronic cocaine exposure can produce alterations in dopaminergic neurotransmission, sustained compensatory changes in dopamine receptor expression do not appear to occur in the human. © 1993.

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Meador-Woodruff, J. H., Little, K. Y., Damask, S. P., Mansour, A., & Watson, S. J. (1993). Effects of cocaine on dopamine receptor gene expression: A study in the postmortem human brain. Biological Psychiatry, 34(6), 348–355. https://doi.org/10.1016/0006-3223(93)90178-G

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