Estimation of low back moments from video analysis: A validation study

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Abstract

This study aimed to develop, compare and validate two versions of a video analysis method for assessment of low back moments during occupational lifting tasks since for epidemiological studies and ergonomic practice relatively cheap and easily applicable methods to assess low back loads are needed. Ten healthy subjects participated in a protocol comprising 12 lifting conditions. Low back moments were assessed using two variants of a video analysis method and a lab-based reference method. Repeated measures ANOVAs showed no overall differences in peak moments between the two versions of the video analysis method and the reference method. However, two conditions showed a minor overestimation of one of the video analysis method moments. Standard deviations were considerable suggesting that errors in the video analysis were random. Furthermore, there was a small underestimation of dynamic components and overestimation of the static components of the moments. Intraclass correlations coefficients for peak moments showed high correspondence (>0.85) of the video analyses with the reference method. It is concluded that, when a sufficient number of measurements can be taken, the video analysis method for assessment of low back loads during lifting tasks provides valid estimates of low back moments in ergonomic practice and epidemiological studies for lifts up to a moderate level of asymmetry. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

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APA

Coenen, P., Kingma, I., Boot, C. R. L., Faber, G. S., Xu, X., Bongers, P. M., & van Dieën, J. H. (2011). Estimation of low back moments from video analysis: A validation study. Journal of Biomechanics, 44(13), 2369–2375. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jbiomech.2011.07.005

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