4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid prevents acute APAP-induced liver injury by increasing phase II and antioxidant enzymes in mice

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Abstract

Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the principal cause of drug-induced acute liver failure. 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (4-HPA), a major microbiota-derived metabolite of polyphenols, is involved in the antioxidative action. This study seeks to investigate the ability of 4-HPA to protect against APAP-induced hepatotoxicity, as well as the putative mechanisms involved. Mice were treated with 4-HPA (6, 12, or 25 mg/kg) for 3 days, 1 h after the last administration of 4-HPA, a single dose of APAP was intraperitoneally infused for mice. APAP caused a remarkable increase of oxidative stress markers, peroxynitrite formation, and fewer activated phase II enzymes. 4-HPA increased Nrf2 translocation to the nucleus and enhanced the activity of phase II and antioxidant enzymes, and could thereby ameliorate APAP-induced liver injury. Studies reveal that 4-HPA, as an active area of bioactive dietary constituents, could protect the liver against APAP-induced injury, implying that 4-HPA could be a new promising strategy and natural hepatoprotective drug.

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APA

Zhao, H., Jiang, Z., Chang, X., Xue, H., Yahefu, W., & Zhang, X. (2018). 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid prevents acute APAP-induced liver injury by increasing phase II and antioxidant enzymes in mice. Frontiers in Pharmacology, 9(JUN). https://doi.org/10.3389/fphar.2018.00653

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