F1C fimbriae play an important role in biofilm formation and intestinal colonization by the escherichia coli commensal strain nissle 1917

73Citations
Citations of this article
101Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

Bacterial bifilm formation is thought to enhance survival in natural environments and during interaction with hosts. A robust colonizer of the human gastrointestinal tract, Escherichia coli Nissle 1917, is widely employed in probiotic therapy. In this study, we performed a genetic screen to identify genes that are involved in Nissle bifilm formation. We found that F1C fimbriae are required for biofilm formation on an inert surface. In addition, these structures are also important for adherence to epithelial cells and persistence in infant mouse colonization. The data suggest a possible connection between Nissle biofilm formation and the survival of this commensal within the host. Further study of the requirements for robust biofilm formation may improve the therapeutic efficacy of Nissle 1917. ©2009, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Lasaro, M. A., Salinger, N., Zhang, J., Wang, Y., Zhong, Z., Goulian, M., & Zhu, J. (2009). F1C fimbriae play an important role in biofilm formation and intestinal colonization by the escherichia coli commensal strain nissle 1917. Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 75(1), 246–251. https://doi.org/10.1128/AEM.01144-08

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free