Function of Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Monocrotaline-Induced Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension through miR-191 via Regulation of BMPR2

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Abstract

Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a serious condition. However, prevailing therapeutic strategies are not effective enough to treat PAH. Therefore, finding an effective therapy is clearly warranted. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) and ASCs-derived exosomes (ASCs-Exos) exert protective effects in PAH, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Using a coculture of ASCs and monocrotaline pyrrole (MCTP)-treated human pulmonary artery endothelial cells (HPAECs), we demonstrated that ASCs increased cell proliferation in MCTP-treated HPAECs. Results showed that ASCs-Exos improved proliferation of both control HPAECs and MCTP-treated HPAECs. In addition, by transfecting ASCs with antagomir we observed that low exosomal miR-191 expression inhibited HPAECs proliferation whereas the agomir improved. Similar results were observed in vivo using a monocrotaline (MCT)-induced PAH rat model following ASCs transplantation. And ASCs transplantation attenuated MCT-induced PAH albeit less than the antagomir treated group. Finally, we found that miR-191 repressed the expression of bone morphogenetic protein receptor 2 (BMPR2) in HPAECs and PAH rats. Thus, we conjectured that miR-191, in ASCs and ASCs-Exos, plays an important role in PAH via regulation of BMPR2. These findings are expected to contribute to promising therapeutic strategies for treating PAH in the future.

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Zhang, C., Wang, P., Mohammed, A., Zhou, Z., Zhang, S., Ni, S., & Tang, Z. (2019). Function of Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Monocrotaline-Induced Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension through miR-191 via Regulation of BMPR2. BioMed Research International, 2019. https://doi.org/10.1155/2019/2858750

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