Regular crabmeat consumers do not show increased urinary cadmium or beta-2-microglobulin levels compared to non-crabmeat consumers

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Abstract

Cadmium (Cd) is a toxic metal that can be relatively high in brown meat from crab and there is concern that it may accumulate in long-term crabmeat consumers posing a health risk. Sixteen healthy habitual crabmeat consumers and twenty five healthy non-crabmeat consumers were recruited through completion of a seafood frequency questionnaire. Whole blood and urine samples were analysed for Cd levels and urinary beta-2-microglobulin, an established marker of Cd-induced kidney toxicity, to determine levels in crabmeat consumers. Whole blood Cd levels were significantly elevated in the crabmeat-consuming group, whereas urinary levels of Cd and beta-2-microglobulin were not. Whole blood Cd levels can be both a short and long-term marker for Cd intake and levels might be expected to be elevated in the crabmeat consumers as crabmeat can contain Cd. However, crabmeat consumers did not show increases in a more established long-term marker of Cd (urinary Cd) and consistent with this, no change in a Cd-induced kidney toxicity marker. Consequently, in conclusion, compared to consumers who reported very little crabmeat consumption, healthy middle-aged consumers who regularly consume brown crabmeat products (an average of 447 g/week) for an average of 16 years showed no change in long-term Cd exposure or kidney toxicity.

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APA

Dyck, K. N., Bashir, S., Horgan, G. W., & Sneddon, A. A. (2019). Regular crabmeat consumers do not show increased urinary cadmium or beta-2-microglobulin levels compared to non-crabmeat consumers. Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology, 52, 22–28. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jtemb.2018.10.020

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