Combining noise mapping and ventilation performance for non-domestic buildings in an urban area

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Abstract

Maximising the natural ventilation of a building can be beneficial in terms of comfort and reduced reliance on air-conditioning. However, in urban areas this can conflict with the need to reduce the ingress of external noise. In this paper a method is presented to quantify the interaction of building noise exposure with natural ventilation potential. Finite element models of ventilation aperture sound reduction index were used to determine façade sound insulation values for naturally ventilated buildings in two locations. Road traffic noise levels at the building façade were obtained from a calculated noise map of Manchester (UK). Window openings were adjusted in the thermal simulation package and modelled with mixed mode cooling ventilation strategies (both natural and mechanical). This enabled noise considerations to be quantified in terms of building ventilation and energy use for cooling at the whole building level. For a tolerated internal road noise ingress of 34dB(A) cooling energy consumption for the example buildings in the quieter noise locations was found to decrease by 22%-45% compared to the noisier locations. Most importantly, the introduction of noise reduction measures equal to 10dB(A) resulted in reductions in cooling energy consumption that varied from 28% to 45% of the original cooling energy consumption. This study illustrates the importance of an integrated approach to both noise exposure and ventilation performance in urban buildings. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

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APA

Barclay, M., Kang, J., & Sharples, S. (2012). Combining noise mapping and ventilation performance for non-domestic buildings in an urban area. Building and Environment, 52, 68–76. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.buildenv.2011.12.015

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