Exposure to fine particulate matter 2.5 from wood combustion smoke causes vascular changes in placenta and reduce fetal size

0Citations
Citations of this article
4Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.
Get full text

Abstract

During gestation, maternal blood flow to the umbilical cord and placenta increases, facilitating efficient nutrient absorption, waste elimination, and effective gas exchange for the developing fetus. However, the effects of exposure to wood smoke during this period on these processes are unknown. We hypothesize that exposure to PM2.5, primarily sourced from wood combustion for home heating, affects placental vascular morphophysiology and fetal size. We used exposure chambers that received either filtered or unfiltered air. Female rats were exposed to PM2.5 during pre-gestational and/or gestational stages. Twenty-one days post-fertilization, placentas were collected via cesarean section. In these placentas, oxygen diffusion capacity was measured, and the expression of angiogenic factors was analyzed using qPCR and immunohistochemistry. In groups exposed to PM2.5 during pre-gestational and/or gestational stages, a decrease in fetal weight, crown-rump length, theoretical and specific diffusion capacity, and an increase in HIF-1α expression were observed. In groups exposed exclusively to PM2.5 during the pre-gestational stage, there was an increase in the expression of placental genes Flt-1, Kdr, and PIGF. Additionally, in the placental labyrinth region, the expression of angiogenic factors was elevated. Changes in angiogenesis and angiogenic factors reflect adaptations to hypoxia, impacting fetal growth and oxygen supply. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that exposure to PM2.5, emitted from wood smoke, in both pre-gestational and gestational stages, affects fetal development and placental health. This underscores the importance of addressing air pollution in areas with high levels of wood smoke, which poses a significant health risk to pregnant women and their fetuses.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Villarroel, F., Ponce, N., Gómez, F. A., Muñoz, C., Ramírez, E., Nualart, F., & Salinas, P. (2024). Exposure to fine particulate matter 2.5 from wood combustion smoke causes vascular changes in placenta and reduce fetal size. Reproductive Toxicology, 127. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.reprotox.2024.108610

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free