The direct and indirect effects of self-efficacy and problem solving on mental health in adolescents: Assessing the role of coping strategies as mediating mechanism

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Abstract

This study investigated the relationship of self-efficacy and problem solving with mental health in adolescents. 914 students (428 boys and 486 girls) completed the General Self-efficacy Scale (GSE; Schwarzer & Jerusalem, 1995), the Problem Solving Inventory (PSI; Heppner & Petersen, 1982), the Coping Scale (CS; Moos & Billings, 1982) and the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28; Goldberg, 1972). Results revealed that self-efficacy and problem solving were the powerful direct predictors of mental health, and efficient coping and inefficient coping were mediated on the relationship between self-efficacy and problem solving with mental health. Ineffective coping was mediated on the relationship between problem solving and mental health. The findings of this study provided evidence for the mediating mechanisms through which effective coping and ineffective coping mediated the relationships between self-efficacy and problem solving with mental health in adolescents. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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Parto, M., & Besharat, M. A. (2011). The direct and indirect effects of self-efficacy and problem solving on mental health in adolescents: Assessing the role of coping strategies as mediating mechanism. In Procedia - Social and Behavioral Sciences (Vol. 30, pp. 639–643). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.sbspro.2011.10.124

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