Fructose-Asparagine Is a Primary Nutrient during Growth of Salmonella in the Inflamed Intestine

28Citations
Citations of this article
53Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (Salmonella) is one of the most significant food-borne pathogens affecting both humans and agriculture. We have determined that Salmonella encodes an uptake and utilization pathway specific for a novel nutrient, fructose-asparagine (F-Asn), which is essential for Salmonella fitness in the inflamed intestine (modeled using germ-free, streptomycin-treated, ex-germ-free with human microbiota, and IL10-/- mice). The locus encoding F-Asn utilization, fra, provides an advantage only if Salmonella can initiate inflammation and use tetrathionate as a terminal electron acceptor for anaerobic respiration (the fra phenotype is lost in Salmonella SPI1- SPI2- or ttrA mutants, respectively). The severe fitness defect of a Salmonella fra mutant suggests that F-Asn is the primary nutrient utilized by Salmonella in the inflamed intestine and that this system provides a valuable target for novel therapies. © 2014 Ali et al.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Ali, M. M., Newsom, D. L., González, J. F., Sabag-Daigle, A., Stahl, C., Steidley, B., … Ahmer, B. M. M. (2014). Fructose-Asparagine Is a Primary Nutrient during Growth of Salmonella in the Inflamed Intestine. PLoS Pathogens, 10(6). https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1004209

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free