Habitual cognitive reappraisal was negatively related to perceived immorality in the Harm and Fairness domains

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Abstract

© 2017 Li, Wu, Zhang and Zhang. Emotion plays an important role in moral judgment, and people always use emotion regulation strategies to modulate emotion, consciously or unconsciously. Previous studies had investigated only the relationship between emotion regulation strategies and moral judgment in the Harm domain, and revealed divergent results. Based on Moral Foundations Theory, the present study extended the investigation into moral judgment in all five moral domains and used a set of standardized moral vignettes. Two hundred and six college students filled in the Emotion Regulation Questionnaire and completed emotional ratings and moral judgment on moral vignettes from Moral Foundations Vignettes. Correlation analysis indicated that habitual cognitive reappraisal was negatively related to immorality rating in Harm, Fairness, and Loyalty domains. Regression analysis revealed that after controlling the effect of other variables, cognitive reappraisal negatively predicted immorality ratings in the Harm and Fairness domains. Further mediation analysis showed that emotional valence only partially explained the association between cognitive reappraisal and moral judgment in Harm area. Some other factors beyond emotional valence were suggested for future studies.

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Li, Z., Wu, X., Zhang, L., & Zhang, Z. (2017). Habitual cognitive reappraisal was negatively related to perceived immorality in the Harm and Fairness domains. Frontiers in Psychology, 8(OCT). https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2017.01805

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