Heat Strain Decision Aid (HSDA) accurately predicts individual-based core body temperature rise while wearing chemical protective clothing

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Abstract

Purpose: We examined the accuracy of the Heat Strain Decision Aid (HSDA) as a predictor of core body temperature in healthy individuals wearing chemical protective clothing during laboratory and field exercises in hot and humid conditions. Methods: The laboratory experiment examined three chemical protective clothing ensembles in eight male volunteers (age 24 ± 6 years; height 178 ± 5 cm; body mass 76.6 ± 8.4 kg) during intermittent treadmill marching in an environmental chamber (air temperature 29.3 ± 0.1 °C; relative humidity 56 ± 1%; wind speed 0.4 ± 0.1 m s −1 ). The field experiment examined four different chemical protective clothing ensembles in twenty activity military volunteers (26 ± 5 years; 175 ± 8 cm; 80.2 ± 12.1 kg) during a prolonged road march (26.0 ± 0.5 °C; 55 ± 3%; 4.3 ± 0.7 m s −1 ). Predictive accuracy and precision were evaluated by the bias, mean absolute error (MAE), and root mean square error (RMSE). Additionally, accuracy was evaluated using a prediction bias of ±0.27 °C as an acceptable limit and by comparing predictions to observations within the standard deviation (SD) of the observed data. Results: Core body temperature predictions were accurate for each chemical protective clothing ensemble in laboratory (Bias −0.10 ± 0.36 °C; MAE 0.28 ± 0.24 °C; RMSE 0.37 ± 0.24 °C) and field experiments (Bias 0.23 ± 0.32 °C; MAE 0.30 ± 0.25 °C; RMSE 0.40 ± 0.25 °C). From all modeled data, 72% of all predictions were within one standard deviation of the observed data including 92% of predictions for the laboratory experiment (SD ± 0.64 °C) and 67% for the field experiment (SD ± 0.38 °C). Individual-based predictions showed modest errors outside the SD range with 98% of predictions falling <1 °C; while, 81% of all errors were within 0.5 °C of observed data. Conclusion: The HSDA acceptably predicts core body temperature when wearing chemical protective clothing during laboratory and field exercises in hot and humid conditions.

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Potter, A. W., Hunt, A. P., Cadarette, B. S., Fogarty, A., Srinivasan, S., Santee, W. R., … Looney, D. P. (2019). Heat Strain Decision Aid (HSDA) accurately predicts individual-based core body temperature rise while wearing chemical protective clothing. Computers in Biology and Medicine, 107, 131–136. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compbiomed.2019.02.004

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