A human right to be detained? Mental healthcare after 'Savage' and 'Rabone'

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Abstract

The UK courts have recently considered the management of suicidal patients in the cases of Savage and Rabone. As a result of these judgments, the case law has extended significantly the responsibilities of mental healthcare providers. In this article we discuss the repercussions of these landmark decisions which are likely to have significant consequences for mental health service providers in the UK. Declaration of interest: M.S.R. is employed by the National Confidential Inquiry into Suicide and Homicide by People with Mental Illness (NCISH). NCISH had no role in the conception or preparation of this article. The views expressed here are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of the NCISH. N.W. acted as the legal counsel for the NHS mental health trust in Rabone v. Pennine Care NHS Foundation Trust (2012). The views expressed here are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Hempsons (solicitors).

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APA

Rahman, M. S., & Wolferstan, N. (2013). A human right to be detained? Mental healthcare after “Savage” and “Rabone.” Psychiatrist, 37(9), 294–296. https://doi.org/10.1192/pb.bp.112.040980

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