Impaired Sleep Quality is Associated With More Significant Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms in Male Shift Workers

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Abstract

Objective To determine the association between sleep quality and severity of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in men working nonstandard shifts, a population at risk of poor sleep quality. Methods Men who presented to a single andrology clinic between July and October 2014 and worked nonstandard shifts completed the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) and responded to questions regarding their work habits, sleep quality, and physical or cognitive function. We assessed the relationship between age, sleep quality, physical or cognitive function, and severity of LUTS. Results A total of 228 men with a mean ± standard deviation age of 41.8 ± 5.7 (range 21-76) years reported working nonstandard shifts, with the majority working these shifts for more than 1 year (81%). Men with difficulties falling asleep reported more severe LUTS than men who did not have difficulty falling asleep (IPSS score 9 vs 6, P <.001). Men who reported difficulty staying asleep or falling back asleep after awakening also reported more severe LUTS (IPSS scores 6 vs 13, P = .004; 5 vs 13, P <.001, respectively). Men with a decreased sense of well-being or decreased physical or cognitive function also reported more severe LUTS (IPSS score 6 vs 9, P <.0010; 6 vs 10, P = .016, respectively). All findings were independent of subject age. Conclusion Men working nonstandard shifts who have difficulty falling asleep, staying asleep, and falling back asleep report more severe LUTS than men without similar sleep difficulties. Men with a decreased sense of well-being or decreased physical or cognitive function also report worse LUTS. These findings implicate sleep quality as a possible risk factor for LUTS symptom severity.

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APA

Scovell, J. M., Pastuszak, A. W., Slawin, J., Badal, J., Link, R. E., & Lipshultz, L. I. (2017). Impaired Sleep Quality is Associated With More Significant Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms in Male Shift Workers. Urology, 99, 197–202. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.urology.2016.05.076

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