The MADS-box transcription factor SrfA is required for actin cytoskeleton organization and spore coat stability during Dictyostelium sporulation

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Abstract

The MADS-box transcription factor SrfA is involved in spore differentiation in Dictyostelium [Development 125 (1998) 3801]. Mutant spores show an altered morphology and loss of viability. A detailed structural analysis of mutant spores has been performed to gain insight into the specific aspects of spore differentiation in which SrfA is involved. Two main structural defects have been observed. One is the formation of high order actin structures, the so-called actin rods. SrfA mutant spores showed the initial stages of rod formation but no mature rods were found in older spores either in the nucleus or the cytoplasm. Moreover, phosphorylation of actin, that is believed to stabilize the actin rods, is strongly reduced in the mutant. The other defect observed was the formation of the spore coat. Young srfA- spores show basically normal trilaminar coat structures suggesting that release of prespore vesicles and basic assembly of the coat takes place in the absence of SrfA. However, the outer layer gets wavier as the spore ages and suffers a progressive degradation suggesting a late defect in the stability of the spore coat. Taken together, these results suggest that SrfA is involved in late events of spore maturation necessary for spore stability. © 2003 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

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Escalante, R., Yamada, Y., Cotter, D., Sastre, L., & Sameshima, M. (2004). The MADS-box transcription factor SrfA is required for actin cytoskeleton organization and spore coat stability during Dictyostelium sporulation. Mechanisms of Development, 121(1), 51–56. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mod.2003.11.001

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