Method to Reduce Target Motion Through Needle–Tissue Interactions

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Abstract

© 2015, The Author(s). During minimally invasive surgical procedures, it is often important to deliver needles to particular tissue volumes. Needles, when interacting with a substrate, cause deformation and target motion. To reduce reliance on compensatory intra-operative imaging, a needle design and novel delivery mechanism is proposed. Three-dimensional finite element simulations of a multi-segment needle inserted into a pre-existing crack are presented. The motion profiles of the needle segments are varied to identify methods that reduce target motion. Experiments are then performed by inserting a needle into a gelatine tissue phantom and measuring the internal target motion using digital image correlation. Simulations indicate that target motion is reduced when needle segments are stroked cyclically and utilise a small amount of retraction instead of being held stationary. Results are confirmed experimentally by statistically significant target motion reductions of more than 8% during cyclic strokes and 29% when also incorporating retraction, with the same net insertion speed. By using a multi-segment needle and taking advantage of frictional interactions on the needle surface, it is demonstrated that target motion ahead of an advancing needle can be substantially reduced.

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APA

Oldfield, M. J., Leibinger, A., Seah, T. E. T., & Rodriguez y Baena, F. (2015). Method to Reduce Target Motion Through Needle–Tissue Interactions. Annals of Biomedical Engineering, 43(11), 2794–2803. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10439-015-1329-0

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