Neutrophil-mediated vasoconstriction and endothelial dysfunction in low-flow perfusion-reperfused cat coronary artery

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Abstract

We investigated the interaction between activated cat polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) and coronary vascular endothelial cells in vitro. It was shown that 1) 90 minutes of low-flow perfusion without reperfusion had no deleterious effects on endothelium-dependent vasodilation, whereas 90 minutes of low-flow perfusion and 20 minutes of reperfusion with a blood cell-free solution induced a 20-25% endothelial dysfunction; 2) activated PMNs produced endothelium-dependent vasoconstriction in coronary artery rings isolated from cat hearts undergoing 90 minutes of low-flow perfusion and 20 minutes of reperfusion with a blood cell-free Krebs-Henseleit solution; 3) addition of the superoxide free radical scavenger, superoxide dismutase (150 μg/ml), or an antibody directed against CD18 of PMN adherence glycoprotein complex (MAbR15.7, 20 μg/ml) attenuated PMN-induced vasoconstriction significantly, but addition of a hydroxyl radical scavenger [N-(2-mercaptopropionyl)-glycine, 150 μg/ml], a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, or a lipoxygenase inhibitor had no protective effect; 4) exposure of rings to a superoxide radical-generating system (i.e., xanthine and xanthine oxidase) produced significant vasoconstriction that was similar to that observed with activated PMNs and was inhibited by superoxide dismutase; and 5) activated PMNs produced a marked coronary endothelial dysfunction characterized by a decreased response to the endothelium-dependent vasodilators acetylcholine and A23187. Addition of either superoxide dismutase or MAbR15.7 protected against endothelial dysfunction. These results indicate that activated PMNs produce significant vasoconstriction and endothelial dysfunction in coronary arteries isolated from low-flow perfusion-reperfused hearts. These effects appear to be mediated primarily by superoxide radicals generated by activated PMNs that either inactivate or inhibit the synthesis and release of endothelium-derived relaxing factor. We conclude that activated PMNs are able to induce endothelial dysfunction by releasing free radicals and possibly other substances.

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APA

Ma, X. L., Tsao, P. S., Viehman, G. E., & Lefer, A. M. (1991). Neutrophil-mediated vasoconstriction and endothelial dysfunction in low-flow perfusion-reperfused cat coronary artery. Circulation Research, 69(1), 95–106. https://doi.org/10.1161/01.RES.69.1.95

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