Postambulatory Hand Swelling (Big Hand Syndrome): Prevalence, Demographics, and Association with Dog Walking

  • Ravaglia F
  • Leite M
  • Bracellos T
  • et al.
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Abstract

Introduction. Postambulatory hand swelling (PAHS) seems to be common in the general population. There are few mention in the medical literature. The objective were (1) to identify prevalence; (2) to compare gender and age groups; (3) to determine if dog owners and walkers are more or less prone. Materials and Methods. 1009 semirandomly surveys were completed from walkers. Age, gender, and dog ownership were assessed. We discussed, among dog owners, whether or not they walk their dog regularly, whether or not they notice swollen hands after walking, and, if so, if the swelling resolves over 24 hours or persists. Results. 699 females and 410 males, among whom, 28.9% of females but only 16.3% of males reported PAHS ( P<0.001 ). Surprisingly, those with swelling were statistically younger than those without (49.2 versus 52.8 years, P=0.003 ), and dog owners were more likely than nonowners to report swelling (28.1% versus 21.7%; P=0.015 ). In terms of persistent swelling, this was observed in twice the percentage of females as males (13.3 versus 6.5%) and tended to involve older subjects (54.0 versus 48.8 years), but with no statistical difference significance. Conclusions. PAHS is a relatively common phenomenon, seemingly more common in females.

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Ravaglia, F. F. A., Leite, M. G., Bracellos, T. F., & Cliquet, A. (2011). Postambulatory Hand Swelling (Big Hand Syndrome): Prevalence, Demographics, and Association with Dog Walking. ISRN Rheumatology, 2011, 1–4. https://doi.org/10.5402/2011/659695

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