Predictors of mobilizing online coping versus offline coping resources after negative life events

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Abstract

This exploratory study drew upon the social compensation/social enhancement hypotheses and weak tie network theory to predict what kind of people supplement offline coping resources with online coping resources more than others. Using a large, representative survey the authors found that low self-esteem, lonely, and socially isolated individuals add more online resources to their mix of preferred coping strategies than their counterparts. These groups benefit from the fact that online coping resources are not as strongly entangled with online social ties as are offline coping resources with offline ties, and from the fact that online coping resources can sometimes be mobilized without any social interactions. In contrast to offline coping, the researchers also found that men mobilize more online coping resources than women. The authors discuss the implications of these findings in terms of the social compensation hypothesis and online weak tie networks.

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APA

Van Ingen, E., & Wright, K. B. (2016). Predictors of mobilizing online coping versus offline coping resources after negative life events. Computers in Human Behavior, 59, 431–439. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2016.02.048

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