Prevalence and treatment of post partum urinary incontinence

  • Mørkved S
  • Bø K
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Abstract

<strong><span style="font-family: TimesNewRomanPS-BoldMT;"><span style="font-family: TimesNewRomanPS-BoldMT;"><p align="left"> </p></span></span><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: TimesNewRomanPS-BoldMT;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: TimesNewRomanPS-BoldMT;">SUMMARY</span></span></strong><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: TimesNewRomanPSMT;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: TimesNewRomanPSMT;"><p align="left">Childbirth is often considered the main etiological factor in the development of female urinary incontinence</p><p align="left">(UI). For that reason women in the western countries have been encouraged to engage in post partum</p><p align="left">pelvic floor muscle (PFM) exercise in order to strengthen the pelvic floor. However, the effect of post partum</p><p align="left">PFM exercise has been sparsely documented. The aim of this article is to review and discuss literature</p><p align="left">related to prevalence of post partum UI and effect of post partum PFM exercise in the treatment of UI. The</p><p align="left">reported prevalence of UI post partum varies from 0.7% to 44%. The variation may be explained by</p><p align="left">different definitions of UI used in the questionnaires and that the registration of incontinence was done at</p><p align="left">different intervals after delivery. A few studies have tried to evaluate the effect of post natal PFM exercise.</p><p align="left">Some have evaluated PFM strength, others the frequency of UI. PFM strength is difficult to measure and</p><p align="left">the reliability and validity of the methods used is open to question. Another flaw in some of the previous</p><p align="left">studies is the training protocol applied to improve PFM strength. Mørkved and Bø tried to take into</p><p align="left">account the above mentioned methodological considerations, in a study aiming to evaluate the effect of</p><p align="left">post partum PFM exercise. The results demonstrate that post partum PFM exercise is effective in</p><p align="left">strengthening the PFM and in the treatment of UI. However, success of PFM exercise is dependent upon</p><p align="left">both the training frequency and intensity. This requires a closer follow up of the post partum women, than</p><p align="left">the written information that usually serves this purpose at the present time.</p></span></span><strong><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: TimesNewRomanPS-BoldMT;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: TimesNewRomanPS-BoldMT;"><strong><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: TimesNewRomanPS-BoldMT;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: TimesNewRomanPS-BoldMT;"><p>Key words</p></span></span></strong></span><strong><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: TimesNewRomanPS-BoldMT;"><p> </p></span></strong></span><p> </p></strong><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: TimesNewRomanPSMT;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: TimesNewRomanPSMT;">: physiotherapy, pelvic floor muscles, urinary incontinence, post partum exercise, prevalence</span></span>

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CITATION STYLE

APA

Mørkved, S., & Bø, K. (2009). Prevalence and treatment of post partum urinary incontinence. Norsk Epidemiologi, 7(1). https://doi.org/10.5324/nje.v7i1.393

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