Red and processed meat consumption and gastric cancer risk: A systematic review and meta-analysis

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Abstract

The associations between red and processed meat consumption and gastric cancer risk have remained inconclusive. We performed a systematic review and metaanalysis to analyze these associations. We searched PubMed and EMBASE to identify studies published from inception through October 2016. Subtype analyses of gastric cancer (gastric cardia adenocarcinoma and gastric non-cardiac adenocarcinoma) and dose-response analyses were performed. We finally selected 42 eligible studies. The summary relative risks of highest versus lowest consumption were positive for casecontrol studies with 1.67 (1.36-2.05) for red meat and 1.76 (1.51-2.05) for processed meat, but negative for cohort studies with 1.14 (0.97-1.34) for red meat and 1.23 (0.98-1.55) for processed meat. Subtype analyses of cohort studies suggested null results for gastric cardia adenocarcinoma (red meat, P = 0.79; processed meat, P = 0.89) and gastric non-cardiac adenocarcinoma (red meat, P = 0.12; processed meat, P = 0.12). In conclusion, the present analysis suggested null results between red and processed meat consumption and gastric cancer risk in cohort studies, although case-control studies yielded positive associations. Further well-designed prospective studies are needed to validate these findings.

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Zhao, Z., Yin, Z., & Zhao, Q. (2017). Red and processed meat consumption and gastric cancer risk: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Oncotarget. Impact Journals LLC. https://doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.15699

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