Reproductive patterns and fertility wishes among HIV-infected patients: Survey from six outpatient clinics in Denmark

1Citations
Citations of this article
24Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

Objectives: Reproductive patterns among HIV patients in Denmark have not previously been described. We aimed to uncover the fertility wishes among Danish HIV-infected persons. Methods: A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was done at six outpatient HIV clinics in Denmark. A total of 409 (56%) HIV patients returned the questionnaire; 323 had completed the questionnaire, although they had not all responded to all of the questions. Results: Among HIV-infected individuals, 49% (137/280) had their own biological children. Fifteen percent (43/280) desired (additional) children and 15% (43/280) were undecided. Female gender, birth outside Europe, young age, completed high school education, heterosexuality, present partner, and non-disclosure were associated with a desire for children in the univariate analysis. In the multivariate analysis only young age, heterosexual orientation, and non-disclosure were significant. Thirty-seven percent (93/250) felt that HIV infection was a hindrance to having more children. The most common reasons indicated were fear of HIV transmission to the child (24%, 59/244) and to the partner (16%, 40/244). Conclusions: Many HIV-infected patients have children and a substantial proportion of HIV-infected patients desire (additional) children, although there is a high degree of fear of HIV transmission to their partner or child. This highlights the need for care providers to improve the services provided to HIV-infected patients who desire to have children. © 2013 International Society for Infectious Diseases.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Laursen, T., Kesmodel, U. S., Højgaard, A., Østergaard, L., Ingerslev, H. J., & Wejse, C. (2013). Reproductive patterns and fertility wishes among HIV-infected patients: Survey from six outpatient clinics in Denmark. International Journal of Infectious Diseases, 17(10). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijid.2013.01.024

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free