Temperature dependence of Ca2+ wave properties in cardiomyocytes: implications for the mechanism of autocatalytic Ca2+ release in wave propagation

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Abstract

Digital imaging microscopy of fluo-3 fluorescence was used to study the velocity and shape of intracellular Ca2+ waves in isolated rat cardiomyocytes as a function of temperature. Decreasing the temperature from 37 to 17 degrees C reduced the longitudinal wave velocity by a factor of 1.8 and remarkably slowed the decay of [Ca2+]i in the trailing flank of a wave. Using image analysis, rise times, and half-maximum decay times of local Ca2+ transients, which characterize the processes of local Ca2+ release and removal, were determined as a function of temperature. Apparent activation energies for wave front propagation, local Ca2+ release, and local Ca2+ removal were derived from Arrhenius plots and amounted to -23, -28, and -46 kJ/mol, respectively. The high activation energy of Ca2+ removal, which arises from the activity of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ ATPase, relative to those of longitudinal wave propagation and local Ca2+ release excludes the hypothetical mechanism of regenerative "spontaneous Ca2+ release," in which Ca2+ that has been taken up from the approaching wavefront triggers Ca2+ release at a luminal site of the SR. It is consistent, however, with the hypothesis that Ca2+ wave propagation is based on Ca(2+)-induced Ca2+ release where Ca2+ triggers release on the cytosolic face of the SR. © 1995, The Biophysical Society. All rights reserved.

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Engel, J., Sowerby, A. J., Finch, S. A., Fechner, M., & Stier, A. (1995). Temperature dependence of Ca2+ wave properties in cardiomyocytes: implications for the mechanism of autocatalytic Ca2+ release in wave propagation. Biophysical Journal, 68(1), 40–45. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0006-3495(95)80196-7

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