Crowdsourcing in the cultural heritage domain

  • Oomen J
  • Aroyo L
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Abstract

Galleries, Libraries, Archives and Museums (short: GLAMs) around the globe are beginning to explore the potential of crowdsourcing, i. e. outsourcing specific activities to a community though an open call. In this paper, we propose a typology of these activities, based on an empirical study of a substantial amount of projects initiated by relevant cultural heritage institutions. We use the Digital Content Life Cycle model to study the relation between the different types of crowdsourcing and the core activities of heritage organizations. Finally, we focus on two critical challenges that will define the success of these collaborations between amateurs and professionals: (1) finding sufficient knowledgeable, and loyal users; (2) maintaining a reasonable level of quality. We thus show the path towards a more open, connected and smart cultural heritage: open (the data is open, shared and accessible), connected (the use of linked data allows for interoperable infrastructures, with users and providers getting more and more connected), and smart (the use of knowledge and web technologies allows us to provide interesting data to the right users, in the right context, anytime, anywhere -- both with involved users/consumers and providers). It leads to a future cultural heritage that is open, has intelligent infrastructures and has involved users, consumers and providers.

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Authors

  • Johan Oomen

  • Lora Aroyo

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