Darwin's principle of divergence

  • Mayr E
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Abstract

It would be whiggish to criticize Darwin for his nominalist way of looking at species and varieties, for this was the universal attitude in his time. Indeed, he frequently did break away from it, particularly in his treatment of natural selection and the acquisition of adaptedness, where he introduced population thinking. 56 Typological thinking also plagued one of Darwin's contemporaries

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Authors

  • Ernst Mayr

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