Depression, illness perception and coping in rheumatoid arthritis

  • Murphy H
  • Dickens C
  • Creed F
 et al. 
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Abstract

This study aimed to establish the relationship between depression, illness perception, coping strategies, and adverse childhood events in rheumatoid arthritis patients. Sixty-two out-patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Illness Perception Questionnaire, London Coping with Rheumatoid Arthritis Questionnaire, and Childhood Development Questionnaire, and underwent a clinical assessment of their physical state. Depressed patients were more disabled than the nondepressed, had a more negative view of their illness, and used more negative coping strategies. There was no association between depression and childhood adversity. Once disability was controlled for, there continued to be a significant correlation between depression and: (i) viewing the consequences of the illness negatively (Spearman's correlation coefficient [r]=0.37, p=0.003); and (ii) the perceived ability to control the illness (r=-0.26, p=0.04). The relationship between depression and negative coping strategies became insignificant. This study indicates the close relationship between depression and a negative view of the illness.

Author-supplied keywords

  • Coping
  • Depression
  • Disability
  • Illness perception
  • Rheumatoid arthritis

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