Driving while black: Effects of race, ethnicity, and gender on citizen self-reports of traffic stops and police actions

  • Lundman R
  • Kaufman R
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Abstract

Are African-American men, compared with white men, more likely to report being stopped by police for traffic law violations? Are Afri- can-American men and Hispanic drivers less likely to report that police had a legitimate reason for the stop and less likely to report that police acted properly? This study answers these questions using citizen self- reports of their traffic stop encounters with the police. Net of other important explanatory variables, the data indicate that police make traf- fic stops for Driving While Black and male. In addition, African- American and Hispanic drivers are less likely to report that police had a legitimate reason ,for the stop and are less likely to report that police acted properly. The study also discusses the validity of citizen self- report data and outlines an agenda for future research.

Author-supplied keywords

  • Driving While Black
  • Traffic stops by the police

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Authors

  • Richard J. Lundman

  • Robert L. Kaufman

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