Effect of incentives upon reactions to peripheral stimuli

  • Bahrick H
  • Fitts P
  • Rankin R
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Abstract

To test the hypothesis that an increase in incentive results in increased perceptual selectiveness favoring those parts of the stimulus field interpreted by the S as most relevant to the expected reward, a modified pursuit apparatus was used as a continuous central-tracking task. A low-incentive condition was produced by telling Ss that the trials were practice, and the high-incentive condition was produced by offering a sliding-scale bonus of money for good performance. The results were in agreement with the prediction that a high-incentive condition facilitates performance of a central task, but generally interferes with the performance of peripheral tasks. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved). © 1952 American Psychological Association.

Author-supplied keywords

  • INCENTIVE, & TRACKING PERFORMANCE
  • LEARNING & MEMORY
  • TRACKING, PERFORMANCE, & INCENTIVE

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  • SGR: 0001088937
  • PMID: 13000086
  • DOI: 10.1037/h0053593
  • PII: S0022101507631760
  • PUI: 282618409
  • SCOPUS: 2-s2.0-0001088937
  • ISSN: 00221015

Authors

  • Harry P. Bahrick

  • Paul M. Fitts

  • Robert E. Rankin

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