Effects of ostracism and social connection-related activities on adolescents' motivation to eat and energy intake

  • Salvy S
  • Bowker J
  • Nitecki L
 et al. 
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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Assess the effect of ostracism and social connection-related activities on adolescents' motivation to eat and their energy intake.

METHODS: Participants (n = 103; M age = 13.6 years) were either ostracized or included when playing a computer game, Cyberball. Next, they wrote about their friend (social-connection), watched television (distraction), or completed Sudoku puzzles (cognitive-load), and then completed a task to earn points toward snack food and/or socializing. Afterwards, participants were given access to food and social activities.

RESULTS: Ostracized adolescents were more motivated to earn food than adolescents who were in the included/control condition. Follow-up contrasts indicated that ostracized adolescents who wrote about friends worked more for food points and consumed more food than other adolescents.

CONCLUSION: Results suggest that social connection-related activities following ostracism may further deplete self-regulatory resources, thereby resulting in increased unhealthy food patterns. Study limitations as well as clinical implications of these findings are discussed.

Author-supplied keywords

  • adolescence
  • eating behavior
  • ostracism
  • social connection

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Authors

  • Sarah Jeanne Salvy

  • Julie C. Bowker

  • Lauren A. Nitecki

  • Melissa A. Kluczynski

  • James N. Roemmich

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