Effects of vaspin, chemerin and omentin-1 on feeding behavior and hypothalamic peptide gene expression in the rat

  • Brunetti L
  • Di Nisio C
  • Recinella L
 et al. 
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Abstract

Visceral adipose tissue-derived serpin (vaspin) improves glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in diet-induced obese mice. Chemerin may increase insulin sensitivity in adipose tissue and seems to be associated with several key aspects of metabolic syndrome. Decreased levels of omentin-1 are associated with increasing obesity and insulin resistance. Our study aimed to investigate the effects of vaspin, chemerin and omentin-1 acute administration on feeding and hypothalamic gene expression of peptides which play a key role in feeding regulation. 35 rats were injected into the arcuate nucleus (ARC) of the hypothalamus with either saline (n = 8), vaspin (1 μg/kg; n = 9), chemerin (8 μg/kg; n = 9), or omentin-1 (8 μg/kg; n = 9). Food intake in the following 24 h was recorded, thereafter rats were sacrificed. Total RNA was extracted from hypothalami and reverse transcribed to evaluate hypothalamic gene expression of agouti-related peptide (AgRP), neuropeptide Y (NPY), orexin-A, cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART), corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRH) and proopiomelanocortin (POMC), by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Compared to vehicle, vaspin injection significantly decreased feeding, while chemerin and omentin-1 had no effect in the tested dose. Vaspin treatment significantly decreased NPY and increased POMC gene expression. Chemerin treatment led to a significant increase of both AgRP and POMC gene expression. Omentin-1 treatment did not modify gene expression of the investigated peptides. Therefore, vaspin is an adipokine triggering anorectic pathways in the hypothalamus, where reduction of NPY and increase of POMC mRNA levels mediate feeding inhibition. Chemerin and omentin-1 have no effect on feeding in the tested dose. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.

Author-supplied keywords

  • Chemerin
  • Feeding
  • Neuropeptide Y
  • Omentin-1
  • Proopiomelanocortin
  • Vaspin

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