Iron species determination to investigate early diagenetic reactivity in marine sediments

  • Haese R
  • Wallmann K
  • Dahmke A
 et al. 
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Abstract

Iron speciation was determined in hemiplegic sediments from a high productivity area to investigate systematically the early diagenetic reactivity of Fe. A combination of various leaching agents (1 M HCl, dithionite buffered in citrate/acetic acid, HF/H2SO4, acetic Cr(II)) was applied to sediment and extracted more than 80% of total Fe. Subsequent Fe species determination defined specific mineral fractions that are available for Fe reduction and fractions formed as products of Fe diagenesis. To determine the Fe speciation of (sheet) silicates we explored an extraction procedure (HF/H2SO4) and verified the procedure by application to standard rocks. Variations of Fe speciation of (sheet) silicates reflect the possible formation of Fe-bearing silicates in near surface sediments. The same fraction indicates a change in the primary input at greater depth, which is supported by other parameters. The Fe(II)/ Fe(III)-ratio of total sediment determined by extractions was compared with Mössbauer-spectroscopy at room temperature and showed agreement within 10%. Mössbauer-spectroscopy indicates the occurrence of siderite in the presence of free sulfide and pyrite, supporting the importance of microenvironments during mineral formation. The occurrence of other Fe(II) bearing minerals such as ankerite (Ca-, Fe-, Mg-carbonate) can be presumed but remains speculative. Copyright © 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd.

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Authors

  • R. R. Haese

  • K. Wallmann

  • A. Dahmke

  • U. Kretzmann

  • P. J. Müller

  • H. D. Schulz

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