Myocardial glucose metabolism assessed by positron emission tomography and the histopathologic findings of microvessels in syndrome X

  • Osamichi S
  • Kouji K
  • Yoshimaro I
 et al. 
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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Syndrome X has been recognized as a disease that is primarily reflected in the cardiac microvasculature. Myocardial metabolism in this condition has been studied, but not in relation to small vessel pathology. METHODS AND RESULTS: In order to examine the relationship between myocardial metabolism and small vessel pathology, 24 consecutive patients with syndrome X (7 men, 17 women; mean age 58 years) were evaluated by the thallium exercise stress test, positron emission tomography using F-18 fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG), and an endomyocardial biopsy. All patients showed either diffuse or focal increase in the myocardial uptake of FDG, but only 17 patients (71%) showed hypoperfused areas with partial or complete redistribution in the thallium study. Quantification of myocardial FDG uptake revealed that the value in syndrome X patients was 10-fold higher than in controls (p

Author-supplied keywords

  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Coronary Angiography
  • Coronary Vessels/metabolism/pathology
  • Emission-Computed
  • Exercise Test
  • Female
  • Fluorodeoxyglucose F18/metabolism
  • Glucose/*metabolism
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Microvascular Angina/*metabolism/*pathology/therap
  • Middle Aged
  • Myocardial Contraction/physiology
  • Myocardium/*metabolism/*pathology
  • Radiopharmaceuticals/metabolism
  • Thallium Radioisotopes/metabolism
  • Tomography

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Authors

  • S Osamichi

  • K Kouji

  • I Yoshimaro

  • U Tadashi

  • T Hiroichi

  • K Seiyu

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