Slime production and antibiotic susceptibility in staphylococci isolated from clinical samples

  • Arslan S
  • Özkardes F
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Abstract

A total of 187 isolates from several clinical specimens were identified to species level as 129 Staphylococcus aureus strains and 58 coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) strains by the API Staph System (Biomerieux). Slime production was detected both by the conventional Christensen's method as well as by the Congo red agar method. Seventy-two strains of staphylococci isolates (38.5%) were found to be slime producers by Christensen's test tube method whereas 58 strains (31%) were slime positive with Congo red agar method. There was no statistically significant difference between the two methods for the detection of slime production (P > 0.05). Susceptibility of isolates against antimicrobial agents was tested by the disk diffusion method. Staphylococcal species had resistance to one or more antibiotics. Among the various antimicrobial agents, oxacillin (71.1%) and erythromycin (47.1%) showed higher resistance than most of the agents used against all isolates. Oxacillin resistant S. aureus (ORSA) and oxacillin resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (ORCNS), 97 (75.2%) and 36 (62.1%) respectively were frequently observed in strains isolated from clinical materials. Among the ORSA strains, two strains were resistant to vancomycin. Moreover, 96 (74.4%) of 129 S. aureus strains were positive for blactamase enzyme. However, 78 (81.25%) of 96 b-lactamase positive S. aureus strains were b-lactamase positive ORSA isolates, but none of them had vancomycin resistance.

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Authors

  • Seza Arslan

  • Fatma Özkardes

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