SOME UNRESOLVED ISSUES OF CONTROL IN CONSUMER TESTS: THE EFFECTS OF EXPECTED MONETARY REWARD AND HUNGER

  • BELL R
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Abstract

Consumer test subjects were split into four groups: (1) Rewarded - told they would receive payment; (2) unrewarded - told they would not receive payment; (3) Hungry - told not to eat before the test; and (4) Pre-fed - told to eat a meal before the test. Hedonic responses for four breaded fish samples were collected. the test design was then repeated using microwave popcorn as stimuli. Rewarded subjects and hungry subjects rated samples higher than did either the unrewarded subjects or the pre-fed subjects. The responses of both the rewarded and the hungry subjects indicated no hedonic differences between samples; but among the unrewarded and the pre-fed subjects, significant differences between samples were found. Results present a dilemma for those experimenters using acceptance ratings by consumers to guide product development. This paper discusses the issue of whether these, and other unresolved factors, need to be controlled when conducting consumer tests.

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Authors

  • RICK BELL

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