Stability of Kyphosis, Strength, and Physical Performance Gains 1 Year after a Group Exercise Program in Community Dwelling Hyperkyphotic Older Women

  • Sarah B. Pawlowsky, DPT, Kate A. Hamel, PhD, Wendy B. Katzman D
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Abstract

ABSTRACT. Pawlowsky SB, Hamel KA, Katzman WB. Stability\r
of kyphosis, strength, and physical performance gains 1 year\r
after a group exercise program in community-dwelling hyperkyphotic\r
older women. Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2009;90:358-61.\r
Objective: To determine if subjects maintained improvements\r
in kyphosis, spinal extensor strength, and physical performance 1\r
year after a 12-week multidimensional group exercise program.\r
Design: Follow-up data compared with posttest outcome\r
measures.\r
Setting: Outpatient academic medical center.\r
Participants: Nineteen of the initial 21 women, ages 65 to\r
80, with thoracic kyphosis of 50° or greater at the onset of the\r
study completed follow-up testing.\r
Interventions: Initial intervention included multidimensional\r
group exercise performed 2 times a week for 12 weeks,\r
consisting of spinal extensor strengthening, flexibility exercises,\r
and integrated spinal proprioception training. Subjects\r
exercised independently during the following year.\r
Main Outcome Measures: Primary measures at the 1-year\r
follow-up were usual and best kyphosis. Secondary measures\r
included spinal extensor strength, modified Physical Performance\r
Test (PPT), and the Jug Test.\r
Results: Subjects maintained gains at the 1-year follow-up\r
(P.05). Best kyphosis improved by 3° during the follow-up\r
year (P.022). There were no significant declines in usual\r
kyphosis (P.302), spinal extensor strength (P.999), PPT\r
(P.087), and the Jug Test (P.999) at follow-up.\r
Conclusions: Hyperkyphotic women maintained gains in usual\r
kyphosis, spinal extensor strength, and physical performance 1\r
year after a group exercise program. Improvement in best kyphosis\r
in the year after the intervention was also observed. Detraining\r
effects may be minimized by multidimensional exercises.

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Authors

  • DPTSc Sarah B. Pawlowsky, DPT, Kate A. Hamel, PhD, Wendy B. Katzman

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