Stress, gender, cognitive impairment, and outpatient physician use in later life.

  • Krause N
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The purpose of this study was to look at the interface between stressful life events, gender, cognitive impairment, and the use of outpatient physician services among older adults. A theoretical rationale is presented, suggesting that older men who are suffering from either mild or moderate levels of cognitive impairment are especially likely to use outpatient physician services when they are confronted by undesirable stressful events. Analyses with data provided by a nationwide sample of elderly people provide support for this complex three-way interaction.

Author-supplied keywords

  • Adaptation, Psychological
  • Age Factors
  • Aged
  • Ambulatory Care
  • Ambulatory Care: utilization
  • Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (U.S.)
  • Cognition Disorders
  • Cognition Disorders: psychology
  • Female
  • Geriatric Assessment
  • Health Status
  • Humans
  • Life Change Events
  • Male
  • Office Visits
  • Questionnaires
  • Sampling Studies
  • Sex Factors
  • United States

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  • SCOPUS: 2-s2.0-0030056991
  • PMID: 8548513
  • SGR: 0030056991
  • ISBN: 1079-5014
  • ISSN: 1079-5014
  • PUI: 26033718


  • N Krause

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