Systemic inflammatory response exacerbates the neuropsychological effects of induced hyperammonemia in cirrhosis

  • Shawcross D
  • Davies N
  • Williams R
 et al. 
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Abstract

Background/Aims: Studies in acute liver failure show correlation between evidence of a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and progression of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). We tested the hypothesis that SIRS mediators, such as nitric oxide and proinflammatory cytokines, may exacerbate the neuropsychological effects of hyperammonemia in cirrhosis. Methods: Ten patients with cirrhosis were studied, 24-36 h after admission with clinical evidence of infection, and following its resolution. Hyperammonemia was induced by oral administration of an amino-acid (aa) solution mimicking hemoglobin composition. Inflammatory mediators, nitrate/nitrite, ammonia, aa profiles and a battery of neuropsychological tests were measured. Results: The hyperammonemia generated in response to the aa solution was similar prior to, and after resolution, of the inflammation (P=0.77). With treatment of the infection there were significant reductions in white blood cell count (WBC), C-reactive protein (CRP), nitrate/nitrite, interleukin-6, interleukin-1β and tumour necrosis factor α. Induced hyperammonemia resulted in significant worsening of the neuropsychological scores when patients showed evidence of SIRS but not after its resolution. Conclusions: The significant deterioration of neuropsychological test scores following induced hyperammonemia during the inflammatory state, but not after its resolution, suggests that the inflammation and its mediators may be important in modulating the cerebral effect of ammonia in liver disease. © 2003 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Author-supplied keywords

  • Amino-acid solution
  • Minimal hepatic encephalopathy
  • Neuropsychological function
  • Proinflammatory cytokines

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