Small acid-soluble proteins with intrinsic disorder are required for UV resistance in myxococcus xanthus spores

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Abstract

Bacterial sporulation in Gram-positive bacteria results in small acid-soluble proteins called SASPs that bind to DNA and prevent the damaging effects of UV radiation. Orthologs of Bacillus subtilis genes encoding SASPs can be found in many sporulating and nonsporulating bacteria, but they are noticeably absent from sporeforming, Gram-negative Myxococcus xanthus. This is despite the fact that M. xanthus can form UV-resistant spores. Here we report evidence that M. xanthus produces its own unique group of low-molecular-weight, acid-soluble proteins that facilitate UV resistance in spores. These M. xanthus-specific SASPs vary depending upon whether spore formation is induced by starvation inside cell aggregations of fruiting bodies or is induced artificially by glycerol induction. Molecular predictions indicate that M. xanthus SASPs may have some association with the cell walls of M. xanthus spores, which may signify a different mechanism of UV protection than that seen in Gram-positive spores. © 2011, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

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Dahl, J. L., & Fordice, D. (2011). Small acid-soluble proteins with intrinsic disorder are required for UV resistance in myxococcus xanthus spores. Journal of Bacteriology, 193(12), 3042–3048. https://doi.org/10.1128/JB.00293-11

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