Three-dimensionally printed surface features to anchor endoluminal spring for distraction enterogenesis

0Citations
Citations of this article
7Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

Spring-mediated distraction enterogenesis has been studied as a novel treatment for short bowel syndrome (SBS). Previous approaches are limited by multiple surgeries to restore intestinal continuity. Purely endoluminal devices require a period of intestinal attachment for enterogenesis. The purpose of this study is to modify the device to prevent premature spring migration in a porcine model. Two models were created in juvenile mini-Yucatan pigs for the placement of three-dimensionally printed springs. (1) Two Roux-en-y jejunojenostomies with two Roux limbs were made. A spring with bidirectional hooked surface features was placed in one Roux limb and a spring with smooth surface was placed in the other Roux limb. (2) The in-continuity model had both hooked and smooth surface springs placed directly in intestinal continuity. Spring location was evaluated by weekly radiographs, and the intestine was retrieved after 2 to 4 weeks. Springs with smooth surfaces migrated between 1 to 3 weeks after placement in both porcine models. Springs with bidirectional hooked surface features were anchored to the intestine for up to 4 weeks without migration. Histologically, the jejunal architecture showed significantly increased crypt depth and muscularis thickness compared to normal jejunum. Bidirectional features printed on springs prevented the premature migration of endoluminal springs. These novel spring anchors allowed for their endoluminal placement without any sutures. This approach may lead to the endoscopic placement of the device for patients with SBS.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Huynh, N., Dubrovsky, G., Rouch, J. D., Scott, A., Chiang, E., Nguyen, T., … Dunn, J. C. Y. (2018). Three-dimensionally printed surface features to anchor endoluminal spring for distraction enterogenesis. PLoS ONE, 13(7). https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0200529

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free