Fine fluorescent powder marking study of dispersal in the spruce bark beetle, Ips typographus (Coleoptera: Scolytidae)

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Abstract

A novel method was used to study dispersal in the spruce bark beetle, Ips typographus (L.), under epidemic conditions (rapidly increasing population density) in the Šumava National Park. Infested spruce logs were coated with a fine fluorescent powder and the passively marked emerging beetles were captured in pheromone baited traps located at various distances from these logs. The number of marked beetles captured decreased exponentially with increasing distance from the release point. The sex ratio of the bark beetles was more female biased the further they were recaptured from the logs, being 57% and 60% at distances of up to 50 and 100 m, respectively. The maximum distance flown by a marked beetle recorded in this experiment was 1094 m. A model fitted to the data on dispersal indicates that 10% of the spruce bark beetles dispersed over distances of 55 m and 4 m in spring (overwintered parental generation) and summer (first filial generation), respectively. Differences between spring and summer swarming are briefly discussed.

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Doležal, P., Okrouhlík, J., & Davídková, M. (2016). Fine fluorescent powder marking study of dispersal in the spruce bark beetle, Ips typographus (Coleoptera: Scolytidae). European Journal of Entomology, 113(1), 1–8. https://doi.org/10.14411/eje.2016.001

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