Altered nasal airflow: an unusual complication following implant surgery in the anterior maxilla

  • Wolff J
  • Karagozoglu K
  • Bretschneider J
  • et al.
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Abstract

Dental implants have been in routine clinical use for over three decades and are a predictable treatment modality. However, as with all other aspects of dentistry, complications occur. A 50-year-old female patient with complaints of a long ongoing unpleasant altered nasal airflow presented herself at the VU University Medical Center Amsterdam. Visual inspection of the right nasal cavity revealed that the apical part of a dental implant placed in the upper right first incisor region had perforated the nasal floor and was partially protruding into the nasal cavity. Subsequent treatment consisted of a transnasal resection of the apical part of the dental implant to the level of the nasal floor. After a 12-month follow-up period, the patient reported having no altered nasal airflow. In conclusion, dental implants protruding into the nasal cavity can cause an alteration to the airflow. Furthermore, a partial removal of the apical part of the dental implant is a viable method of treating dental implants that extend into the nasal cavity.

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Wolff, J., Karagozoglu, K. H., Bretschneider, J. H., Forouzanfar, T., & Schulten, E. A. J. M. (2016). Altered nasal airflow: an unusual complication following implant surgery in the anterior maxilla. International Journal of Implant Dentistry, 2(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s40729-016-0045-3

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