8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1) deficiency elicits coordinated changes in lipid and mitochondrial metabolism in muscle

0Citations
Citations of this article
21Readers
Mendeley users who have this article in their library.

Abstract

Oxidative stress resulting from endogenous and exogenous sources causes damage to cellular components, including genomic and mitochondrial DNA. Oxidative DNA damage is primarily repaired via the base excision repair pathway that is initiated by DNA glycosylases. 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1) recognizes and cleaves oxidized and ring-fragmented purines, including 8-oxoguanine, the most commonly formed oxidative DNA lesion. Mice lacking the OGG1 gene product are prone to multiple features of the metabolic syndrome, including high-fat diet-induced obesity, hepatic steatosis, and insulin resistance. Here, we report that OGG1-deficient mice also display skeletal muscle pathologies, including increased muscle lipid deposition and alterations in genes regulating lipid uptake and mitochondrial fission in skeletal muscle. In addition, expression of genes of the TCA cycle and of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism are also significantly altered in muscle of OGG1-deficient mice. These tissue changes are accompanied by marked reductions in markers of muscle function in OGG1-deficient animals, including decreased grip strength and treadmill endurance. Collectively, these data indicate a role for skeletal muscle OGG1 in the maintenance of optimal tissue function.

Cite

CITATION STYLE

APA

Vartanian, V., Tumova, J., Dobrzyn, P., Dobrzyn, A., Nakabeppu, Y., Lloyd, R. S., & Sampath, H. (2017). 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1) deficiency elicits coordinated changes in lipid and mitochondrial metabolism in muscle. PLoS ONE, 12(7). https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0181687

Register to see more suggestions

Mendeley helps you to discover research relevant for your work.

Already have an account?

Save time finding and organizing research with Mendeley

Sign up for free