Shifting from population-wide to personalized cancer prognosis with microarrays

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Abstract

The era of personalized medicine for cancer therapeutics has taken an important step forward in making accurate prognoses for individual patients with the adoption of high-throughput microarray technology. However, microarray technology in cancer diagnosis or prognosis has been primarily used for the statistical evaluation of patient populations, and thus excludes inter-individual variability and patient-specific predictions. Here we propose a metric called clinical confidence that serves as a measure of prognostic reliability to facilitate the shift from population-wide to personalized cancer prognosis using microarray-based predictive models. The performance of sample-based models predicted with different clinical confidences was evaluated and compared systematically using three large clinical datasets studying the following cancers: breast cancer, multiple myeloma, and neuroblastoma. Survival curves for patients, with different confidences, were also delineated. The results show that the clinical confidence metric separates patients with different prediction accuracies and survival times. Samples with high clinical confidence were likely to have accurate prognoses from predictive models. Moreover, patients with high clinical confidence would be expected to live for a notably longer or shorter time if their prognosis was good or grim based on the models, respectively. We conclude that clinical confidence could serve as a beneficial metric for personalized cancer prognosis prediction utilizing microarrays. Ascribing a confidence level to prognosis with the clinical confidence metric provides the clinician an objective, personalized basis for decisions, such as choosing the severity of the treatment. © 2012 Shao et al.

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Shao, L., Fan, X., Cheng, N., Wu, L., Xiong, H., Fang, H., … Tong, W. (2012). Shifting from population-wide to personalized cancer prognosis with microarrays. PLoS ONE, 7(1). https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0029534

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