Effect of ouabain on myocardial remodeling in rats

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Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ouabain (EO) on myocardial remodeling. Twenty-two adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into two groups: the rats in the EO group (n=12) were intraperitoneally injected with EO daily and those in the control group (n=10) were injected with physiological saline daily. After 8weeks the rats were sacrificed. The ultrastructural changes in the myocardium were observed. The expression levels of voltage-gated potassium channel 4.2 (KV4.2) were detected by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The effects of EO on the myocardial action potential and transient potassium efflux (Ito) were measured by patch clamping. The systolic blood pressure (SBP) of 10 of the 12 rats in the EO group, designated as the EO-sensitive (OS) rats, began to increase from the fifth week of treatment and was significantly higher compared with that of the control group 6 weeks later (P<0.01). The remaining 2 rats in the EO group that presented no increase in SBP following 8 weeks of treatment (P>0.05) were designated as EO-resistant (OR) rats. Pathological ultrastructural changes were significant in the apical mid-myocardium of the OS rats. No significant differences in KV4.2 expression were observed among the OS, OR and control rats. The patch clamp results revealed that EO prolongs the action potential duration, reduces Ito and triggers the electrical remodeling of the myocardium. EO induces a blood pressure increase and triggers structural and electrical remodeling.

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Ren, Y., Zhang, M., Zhang, T., & Huang, R. (2013). Effect of ouabain on myocardial remodeling in rats. Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine, 6(1), 65ā€“70. https://doi.org/10.3892/etm.2013.1098

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