Differences in etiological beliefs about schizophrenia among patients, family, and medical staff

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Abstract

Objectives: To determine whether etiological beliefs are different among schizophrenia patients, their family, and medical staff. Patients and methods: A cross-sectional study was performed at five hospitals and one mental clinic and included 212 patients, 144 family members, and 347 medical staff other than psychiatrists. A questionnaire about the possible etiological causes of schizophrenia was used. Results: There were significant differences in response scores among the three groups on using Angermeyer’s and Goulding’s classifications. Factor analyses revealed the following four subscales: Psychosocial, Biological, Environmental, and Cultural connotations. The structure varied among patients, family, and medical staff. Conclusion: The perspectives of schizophrenia etiology were different among patients, family, and medical staff.

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Tarakita, N., Yoshida, K., Sugawara, N., Kubo, K., Furukori, H., Fujii, A., … Yasui-Furukori, N. (2019). Differences in etiological beliefs about schizophrenia among patients, family, and medical staff. Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, 15, 137–142. https://doi.org/10.2147/NDT.S185483

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